About Janine Monico

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So far Janine Monico has created 132 blog entries.

Good Morning, Santana!

As we entered our ninth month of working at home due to Covid-19, I wanted to share my experience as a mom and professional, getting through this change to our typical day to day lives. I want to start by saying that I am grateful that I am employed and have a job that I can continue to do from home, which, unfortunately for some, was not an option. Without getting on my soap box, I will keep it short and honest about my experience these past months. This transition has been by far the most frustrating transition with my beautiful 2-year-old boy Santana, period! Like anyone who works in an office, you develop a routine. I'm going to just speak on my morning routine, which looked like the following before the pandemic; get up, get dressed, get my son dressed, drop him off at his grandmother's house, and do my cardio (which is power-walking up a hill to the train, praying I catch it.) I say power walk but probably borderline jogging! I used to do my cardio every day before arriving at the office. After catching up with others on my unit, I really miss that moment when you sit down with your coffee (personally, it's iced coffee or tea for me) where you just relax and take [...]

2021-01-02T19:34:32-05:00November 30th, 2020|Family & Youth, Pandemic|

Suicide Loss: A Survivor’s Story

It was Memorial Day, Monday, May 26, 1997. I was 17-years-old, an only child growing up in a middle-class suburban neighborhood. I had just finished my first year at a local community college. I knew I was not ready to go away to college; I had not declared a major yet, but was that the real reason? Looking back now, I realize that there was more that impacted my decision to stay home during my freshman year of college, and thank God I did. It was early that Monday morning, and I was at my mother's house, attempting to sleep in and get some much-needed rest. The house phone rang, waking me up. "Hello?" No one answered. Again, I asked, "Hello?" Still nothing.  I hung up the phone and attempted to fall back asleep. Five minutes later, the phone rang again. "Hello?" No answer. "Hello?" Silence. Again, I hung up the phone and fell back to sleep. An hour or so had passed, and the phone rang again. I was annoyed this time. I picked up the phone, but before I could even say hello, I heard my Grandmother on the other line, and she sounded worried.  She asked if I had seen or heard from my dad this morning. She said he had gone out for a walk a [...]

2021-01-02T15:40:51-05:00November 20th, 2020|Suicide Prevention|

Keep Medicines and Drugs Up and Out of Reach of Children

In an effort to decrease the number of accidental deaths and near deaths in children due to drug ingestion, the Philadelphia Department of Human Services, in partnership with DBHIDS and the Philadelphia Department of Public Health have created a new campaign aimed to help parents and guardians keep children safe. When you have substances in your home, consider these tips to help keep your young ones safe: Keep medicines, paraphernalia, and other hazardous materials up and away:  If at all possible, keep them in cabinets that can be locked or child-proofed with latches. If locks are not easily available, make sure they are placed inside cabinets and drawers and not out in the open.  And be sure to put medicines away after  using them. Talk with your children: Have these conversations with children about medicines and drugs. Understanding how something can be harmful will help kids stay safe. Encourage others to help keep your home safe: When babysitters, extended family, and friends come over, ask that they keep any medicines they may have safely stored in bags or are not brought into the home.  The presence of substances, whether over the counter, legally prescribed, or illegal, present potential safety risks for families, particularly when there are young and mobile toddlers in the home. Death or a near fatal incident can [...]

2021-01-04T21:57:23-05:00November 12th, 2020|Family & Youth|

Millennials: Join the Well City Challenge

Millennials are the largest population in the U.S., the most educated, and the largest wealth generators over the next two decades – yet they are in poorer health than previous generations. Blue Cross Blue Shield Association’s 2019 The Health of Millennials Report found that 8 out of 10 top conditions have double-digit increases among millennials and 6 out of 10 are behavioral health conditions. How we handle their health care challenges could make or break the economy. Because Philadelphia is both a hot spot for millennials and home to world-class health care institutions, we are hopeful that our community can play a leading role in identifying and advancing new physical health and mental health solutions for the millennial generation.    The Economy League of Greater Philadelphia is joining forces with Independence Blue Cross to launch the Well City Challenge - a social impact challenge to engage and support everyday innovators with new creative ideas for addressing Philadelphia’s millennial health and mental health challenges related to three themes: Community and Social Connection, Food and Nutrition, and Mind/Body. These themes are even more important due to the rise of millennial health and mental health challenges during COVID-19, the economic recession, and the rise in the movement to combat racism and social injustice.   The Well City Challenge is focused on Philadelphia and will support community solutions for millennial health and mental health through incubator workshops, a pitch competition, mentorship, accelerator, over $50,000 in prizes and an additional $50,000 in seed investments. The Challenge is open to individuals, community groups, entrepreneurs, nonprofits, and social enterprises. All backgrounds and levels of [...]

2021-01-02T16:06:35-05:00November 11th, 2020|Mental Health|
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