Gratitude Journaling

If you’ve ever thought about beginning a gratitude journal, know that there’s no wrong way to do it. Studies suggest writing in a gratitude journal three times per week might have a greater impact on our well-being than journaling every day. The goal of the exercise is to think about a good event, experience, person, or thing in your life and allow yourself to enjoy the good emotions that come with it. Begin small. In your notebook, write three things you feel grateful about. It doesn’t need to be huge things; don’t overthink it. It can be a plant in your room, a meal you recently enjoyed, or a person who makes you laugh. Here are a few tips or strategies you may find helpful as you get started. Be specific as that fosters gratitude “I’m grateful for my co-workers as they helped me complete my project yesterday” will be more effective than writing “I’m grateful for my coworkers” Go for the details. Elaborating about something you’re grateful for carries more benefits than creating a list of things. Allow yourself to get personal when writing about people to whom you are grateful: focusing on people has more of an impact than focusing on things. See good things as gifts or blessings. Thinking of the good things in your life in this way helps one [...]

2021-03-16T13:35:52-04:00March 16th, 2021|Self-Help|

Men’s Health Month 2020: It’s Time for a Change

With a new decade comes the opportunity to both look back and look forward. This time for reflection gives us all a unique occasion to evaluate how we have been dealing with our health, both physical and mental. Men, especially, should take this time to do just that. According to a Cleveland Clinic study, men are less likely to take care of themselves and their health than women. They are half as likely to visit the doctor for a check-up compared to women. Over 7 million American men have not seen a doctor in over 10 years, citing embarrassment, lack of convenience, not wanting a bad diagnosis, and being told as children not to complain about medical problems as reasons for avoiding doctors visits. It's 2020, and it's time for that to change. Men from 19 to 90 still need routine checkups, and in light of COVID-19, need to take responsibility for their health. In his recent blog, Black men and boys are not immune to COVID-19 Eric Westbrook, Director of the Mayor’s Office of Black Male Engagement writes, “ COVID-19 coronavirus seems to impact those with preexisting health conditions like diabetes, heart and lung disease that make it difficult for them to fight the virus." Here is a decade-by-decade breakdown of when men should be getting certain checkups: 20s: [...]

2021-03-16T13:44:46-04:00June 1st, 2020|Men's Health, Self-Help|

How to take care of your mental health during the coronavirus outbreak

by Dr. Sosunmolu Shoyinka, Chief Medical Officer, City of Philadelphia Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services (DBHIDS) These are stressful and uncertain times. The evolving nature of the COVID-19 pandemic is very sudden and can be confusing. This may provoke anxiety for many people. Those with pre-existing anxiety and other mental health conditions may be particularly at risk. Individuals and teams whose work bring them in contact with infected persons may experience stress and anxiety. Other groups at risk for increased stress include the elderly, those caring for sick or vulnerable persons, and those experiencing significant changes to work, travel, or family life. Regardless of status or work function, we can anticipate that all of us will at some point experience some increased stress. At times like this, it is important to take steps to promote mental wellness and resilience. DBHIDS aligns with SAMHSA, the American Psychological Association, and the American Psychiatric Association to make the following recommendations: Connect with people: Reaching out to people you trust is one of the best ways to reduce anxiety, depression, loneliness, and boredom during social distancing, quarantine, and isolation. Make phone calls frequently, FaceTime, and text to stay connected.   Relax: Calm your body often by doing things that work for you—take deep breaths, stretch, meditate, pray, or engage in home-based [...]

2021-03-16T14:31:57-04:00March 20th, 2020|Anxiety, Awareness, Depression, Pandemic, Self-Help, Stress|

Men’s Health Month: Chasing Brady

As a 35-year-old man, it’s taken me awhile to accept that my body is getting older. I have been an athlete for most of my life, participating in one or two sports each season year-round until college. When I was no longer in organized sports, I had no trouble jumping right back in. If you needed an extra for flag-football, I could jog over to the field, sprint the whole game, head home to clean up, and then go out at 10pm with friends. Now, I’m still active, but I run out of steam, recovery takes longer, my joints ache constantly, bruises never seem to heal, and if I do head out with friends I am home long before 10.  The good news is: the guys I play hockey and softball with are just as old (if not older) and facing the same challenges. If, like me, you have finally accepted that you are getting older, consider these tips to help you stay active and healthy. Get some sleep Sleep is important at any age. When we were younger sleep was not only important for recovery, but also for the growth of our brains and bodies. Most recovery happens in deep sleep, which unfortunately may be harder to reach in adulthood. Establishing a routine is helpful for falling asleep and [...]

2021-03-16T13:47:23-04:00June 21st, 2019|Awareness, Self-Help|
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