About Janine Monico

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So far Janine Monico has created 144 blog entries.

How You Can Help Domestic Violence Victims

If you or someone you know needs support, contact the Philadelphia Domestic Violence Hotline at 866-723-3014 (24/7/365). Call 911 in an emergency. Domestic violence supports are more important than ever. Because of COVID-19, home is more than home. Home is work, school, daycare, and more – all in one place. For domestic violence survivors, this isolation can be more than boring; it may be harmful. Isolation from friends and family is a common tactic used by abusive partners. They may also control cell phone usage, track internet searches, and listen in to phone calls. That is why safe and supportive contact with others is so important for survivors. We know that limiting contact with others lowers the spread of COVID-19. But without seeing friends and family in person, survivors may not have the support systems they need in order to reach out for help. So, aside from calling the hotline, how can you help while we weather the pandemic? Check on your people: Ask your friends and loved ones if they are ok. After you ask, stay quiet. Give your loved one time to talk. If you are worried about certain friends, ask them what mode of communication is safest for them. Let them know how to reach you if they ever need help. Instead of telling them what to do, ask what they need. Let them know about domestic violence resources available in Philadelphia. Post by Alexandra [...]

2021-10-14T16:34:15-04:00October 18th, 2021|Domestic Violence|

LGBTQ+ History Month

October is LGBTQ+ History Month. To celebrate, let’s turn our attention to a couple Philadelphians whose advocacy contributed greatly to the advancement of LGBTQ+ civil rights in the United States. John E. Fryer was a psychiatrist and a faculty member of Temple University School of Medicine. He was also a homosexual. (A note on usage: Homosexual was the word Fryer and others used to self-identify. Today the term is discouraged in favor of gay and lesbian.)  At the time, a homosexual psychiatrist was thought to be an oxymoron. This was because for much of the 20th Century, “homosexuality” was classified as a mental disorder in the Diagnostic Statistical Manual. Of course, Fryer and others like him knew there was nothing inherently disordered about LGBTQ+ identity. Due to their personal and professional experience, they understood better than anyone that the classification of homosexuality as a mental health disorder reflected not pathology in individuals, but deep-seated prejudice in the field and in society at large. Although people like Fryer were ideally positioned to challenge harmful professional practices about sexuality, doing so incurred great personal risk. A psychiatrist who avowed their sexual identity risked the loss of their license and professional ruin. Because of this, LGBTQ+ psychiatrists were faced with a stark choice: conceal their identity or forfeit their careers. Barbara Gittings was [...]

2021-10-11T12:20:25-04:00October 11th, 2021|LGBTQIA|

NDSD: A Yearly Event with a Daily Calling

Imagine a world where we can “call in sick” because our depression is worsening or because anxiety is peaking to a point of emotional and physical paralysis. A world where we can fearlessly acknowledge our mental health challenges and receive support rather than skepticism or judgment. In our society, we are afforded sick days to treat varying physical health conditions, but it is “invisible” pains that create hesitance. Mental health stigma promotes a falsehood that proof is needed to justify anguish. This year more than ever is important for centering our mental health needs. According to the American Psychological Association (APA), nearly eight in 10 adults identified the coronavirus pandemic as a significant source of stress in their lives. Locally, we witness the daily weight of gun violence, poverty, systemic racism, and trauma. However, we can all contribute towards promoting mental wellness in big and small ways. Each year, National Depression Screening Day provides an opportunity to break stigma and recognize mental wellness matters. Behavioral health partners offer multiple sites to receive free behavioral screenings along with valuable resources and the support of trained professionals. We can use Oct. 7 as an opportunity to take a behavioral health screening, reach out to loved ones, or normalize mental health challenges, whether someone else’s or, most importantly, our own. Although this reflection [...]

2021-10-14T13:18:43-04:00October 7th, 2021|Awareness, Depression|

Remembering Life: Infant Loss and Grief

One of the toughest questions I have to answer often as a mother is, “How many children do you have?” I never thought such a simple question could turn my world upside down. If I am in a good place mentally, I might reply, “Do you want the real answer?”   I was one of those people who did things according to plan: met a great guy, dated for a while, got engaged, got married, and then got pregnant… quickly. Everything was going according to my plan. I now look back at those times and cringe because I was so innocent and unaware. Life is not always simple. It doesn’t always go according to plan.  I was about to learn some hard truths in a real way.  We planned a family gender reveal for the night of my 20 week anatomy scan, expecting the sex of our baby to be the focus of the appointment. But during the scan, a leg abnormality was found on my son.  I didn’t want to rob our families of the excitement of finding out the sex of the FIRST grandbaby, so I masked my fear at the party that night. Thinking back, this was when my journey of strength truly began. While I wanted to lay in bed and cry, I pulled it together. I [...]

2021-10-01T09:30:40-04:00October 1st, 2021|Family & Youth, Women's Health|
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