About Janine Monico

This author has not yet filled in any details.
So far Janine Monico has created 134 blog entries.

We Breathe, We Live. Brothery Love Protest Stories

“We Breathe, We Live. Brotherly Love Protest Stories” is a made-for-television film presenting first person experiences of men who participated in the George Floyd protests in Philadelphia during the summer of 2020. Gabriel Bryant, Engaging Males of Color (EMOC) coordinator for the Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services in Philadelphia, wrote a guest post on Generocity.org that highlighted his experience and the approach to the film. Here is an excerpt: We identified seven men of various backgrounds, ages and experiences to share their story, as we prepare for the one-year anniversary of this infamous murder and subsequent summer of protests. Where were they? How did they feel? What was it like to be on the ground in the marches? How has this trauma affected them and/or their loved ones? The director of the film, Glenn Holsten, brought a brave and innovative vision to catalyze and link the ideas presented in the film. These rich stories, plus the inclusion of spoken word poetry and conversations with our DBHIDS EMOC colleagues, give life to a moment that was a peak example of dehumanization. This film has further resonance since we find ourselves in Mental Health Awareness Month; additionally seen in the relief of millions now that Chauvin has been convicted of his charges. “We Breathe, We Live. Brotherly Love Protest [...]

2021-05-30T14:31:55-04:00May 24th, 2021|Community, Racial Equality|

Hope

by Margaret Pelleriti, DBHIDS Suicide Prevention Task Force What does it mean to have hope? Hope means a desire for things to change for the better, and to want that better situation very much. Hope carries us beyond the current hardship so that we may have a better future. In today’s world, it seems that hope can be hard to come by and this tends to be the case for anyone who has lost someone to suicide. My name is Margaret and several years ago, I lost my son Michael, then 16, to suicide. Prior to my loss, suicide never really affected me. To me, it was always other people who faced that tragedy. Not something that would affect myself or my family. When I lost my son to suicide, he was in the 11th grade and did not present any clear warning signs or clues. When he died, I genuinely believed that I would die also. There would be no way that I would be able to survive. I knew that I had to get up each day and do the same routine as before. I was still a wife to my husband and a mother to a 13-year-old daughter. It felt like family and friends expected me to return to some sort of normal. I had faith from [...]

2021-05-12T15:21:26-04:00May 12th, 2021|Family & Youth, Suicide Prevention|

Gratitude Journaling

If you’ve ever thought about beginning a gratitude journal, know that there’s no wrong way to do it. Studies suggest writing in a gratitude journal three times per week might have a greater impact on our well-being than journaling every day. The goal of the exercise is to think about a good event, experience, person, or thing in your life and allow yourself to enjoy the good emotions that come with it. Begin small. In your notebook, write three things you feel grateful about. It doesn’t need to be huge things; don’t overthink it. It can be a plant in your room, a meal you recently enjoyed, or a person who makes you laugh. Here are a few tips or strategies you may find helpful as you get started. Be specific as that fosters gratitude “I’m grateful for my co-workers as they helped me complete my project yesterday” will be more effective than writing “I’m grateful for my coworkers” Go for the details. Elaborating about something you’re grateful for carries more benefits than creating a list of things. Allow yourself to get personal when writing about people to whom you are grateful: focusing on people has more of an impact than focusing on things. See good things as gifts or blessings. Thinking of the good things in your life in this way helps one [...]

2021-03-16T13:35:52-04:00March 16th, 2021|Self-Help|

‘Pandemic Fatigue’: The Impact of Prolonged Social Distancing on Children’s Mental Health

Researchers and public health experts continue to collect important data on children’s mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic, but the full impact of pandemic mitigation measures on child/adolescent mental health may not be known for some time. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in addition to pandemic-related stressors, there may be unintended consequences of public health efforts to effectively manage the pandemic, including reduced or modified access to places such as schools and clinical and community agencies where trained adult professionals are able to identify and help children who may be struggling with mental health or other social-emotional problems. We do, however, know that children and adolescents thrive on positive peer social interactions and that the traditional ways children interact with friends has been significantly limited by the steps required to curb the spread of COVID-19. Those social-emotional bonds are critically important for children and especially teens. As we enter one year since the early stages of the pandemic in March 2020, the real challenge for children is how to physically distance while maintaining socially and emotionally close to others. Though it is important to balance the risk of screen-time overload, technology remains a key resource for allowing children to continue to feel connected to their peers. Equally important is catching warning signs of mental health [...]

2021-03-04T12:06:27-05:00March 4th, 2021|Pandemic|
Go to Top