Domestic Violence Awareness Month 2019

This and every October, Philadelphia recognizes Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Domestic violence can affect anyone — regardless of your class, race, marital status, sexual orientation, or gender identity. Domestic Violence is more than just physical abuse — it is a pattern of behaviors that a partner uses against the other person with the purpose of gaining and maintaining power and control in the relationship. These behaviors can include: isolation, financial deprivation, stalking, emotional abuse, and threats to harm partner, children or pets. Are you thinking about making a change within your relationship? Does your partner make you feel unsafe? Is your partner restricting your access to family, friends and financial resources? According to the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence, these are all common indicators of abuse. If you have answered "yes" to at least one of the questions listed above, there are resources readily available to you in Philadelphia. Always call 911 in an emergency. If you believe someone needs help, let them know they can call the Philadelphia Domestic Violence Hotline at any time at: 1-866-723-3014 3 things you can do: If you see or suspect abuse of a love one: Encourage them to seek the help of an advocate at their local domestic violence center. Reassure them that the abuse is not their fault. Allow your loved one the right [...]

2021-01-02T19:56:52-05:00September 23rd, 2019|Domestic Violence|

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month

Sexual Assault Awareness Month is a campaign to raise public awareness about sexual violence and educate communities on how to prevent it. The campaign theme for 2019 is I Ask – a theme that champions the message that asking for consent is a healthy, normal, and necessary part of everyday interactions. Sexual Assault and Mental Health Sexual assault is not only a physical trauma, but a mental one that can have both short- and long-term effects on a victim’s mental health. According to RAINN (the nation’s largest anti-sexual violence organization), victims of sexual assault are at an increased risk for developing: Depression Substance use disorders Eating disorders Anxiety Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Many survivors experience flashbacks of their assault, and feelings of shame, isolation, shock, and guilt. People who have been sexually assaulted are more likely to use drugs. Events Join the movement by attending Sexual Assault Awareness Events in Philadelphia: 4/11/2019: Teal Day Press Conference 4/14/2019: Benefit Concert 4/26/2019: Hands Around City Hall Consent When someone gives consent, they give their permission for something to happen, or they agree to do something. Consent means they know what they’re agreeing to. It’s not just about asking for consent, but also about listening and accepting the answer. The National Sexual Violence Resource Center offers resources on consent: Asking for Consent Asking [...]

2021-01-04T20:34:48-05:00April 1st, 2019|Domestic Violence, Trauma, Women's Health|

Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month

Teen dating violence is remarkably common, yet it is rarely discussed. According to national statistics, 1 in 3 girls in the U.S. will experience some sort of dating violence, according to the National Youth Risk Behavior Survey. What you can do If you are worried about a friend or family member, here are some tips to guide your conversation: Be supportive – Let the person first talk about what they like about their relationship. Ask how they met and what they like to do together before you voice your concerns. It shows that you value and respect the relationship, even if the couple is young or the relationship is new. Remember to ask them what they want to do about their relationship, and not assume they want to stay in it, or leave it. Ask how you can help. If they don’t want to talk at that time, let them know you’re available when they are ready. Speak about your concerns– Let them know what you are seeing in their relationship that has you worried. Tell them specifically what you are worried about. “I have noticed you stopped hanging out with your friends since you started going out with…”. Give them time to answer and let them know that abuse in a relationship is not their fault. Keep everything confidential – [...]

2019-02-01T01:00:36-05:00February 1st, 2019|Awareness, Domestic Violence|

Trauma & Trafficking

“Trauma and Trafficking” was the theme of Cabrini University’s 8th annual Domestic Violence symposium. The event was sponsored by the Barbara and John Jordan Center for Children of Trauma and Domestic Violence Education, whose purpose is to promote social change through professional development, training, education, and research to end domestic violence and support children exposed to trauma. This symposium illustrated the intersectionality between women who experienced commercial sexual exploitation and the use of violence and control to maintain victimization. Local and regional expert panelists included law enforcement, clinical, medical, school district, and immigrant and advocacy providers. Keynote Speaker Barbara Amaya - a survivor, author, and award-winning advocate in the movement to end human trafficking - shared her experiences as a survivor. She pointed out that anyone who works directly with survivors needs to understand how critical violence, control, and trauma bonds make it difficult to escape these destructive relationships. She stressed the following: Time and trust are required to break the trauma bond Victims never view themselves as being trafficked Providers must ask the right questions that are trauma informed and offer choices Survivor to survivor connections and voices offer hope and empowerment NOBODY’S GIRL BY BARBARA AMAYA How violence, control and false love are used to exploit women In Nobody’s Girl, Barbara Amaya recounts her lost innocence at age [...]

2018-11-16T15:28:44-05:00November 16th, 2018|Domestic Violence, Trauma|
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