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Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month

February is Dating Violence Awareness Month & 2020 marks the 10th anniversary of efforts to end Dating Violence. Enough is enough! Everyone deserves healthy relationships. We can influence change in how we treat our partners and how we respond to acts of abuse. Take ACTION and put an END to Dating Violence. Teen dating violence is remarkably common, yet it is rarely discussed. According to national statistics, 1 in 3 girls in the U.S. will experience some sort of dating violence, according to the National Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Are You a Parent or Guardian of a Teen? Here are 4 tips to guide your conversation about Healthy Relationships: Be open – Allow your teen to express their views of what a healthy relationship looks like. Allow them to reflect without dismissing their views. Teach your teen the signs of an unhealthy relationship – Point out unhealthy behaviors, let them know that…

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Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month

Teen dating violence is remarkably common, yet it is rarely discussed. According to national statistics, 1 in 3 girls in the U.S. will experience some sort of dating violence, according to the National Youth Risk Behavior Survey. What you can do If you are worried about a friend or family member, here are some tips to guide your conversation: Be supportive – Let the person first talk about what they like about their relationship. Ask how they met and what they like to do together before you voice your concerns. It shows that you value and respect the relationship, even if the couple is young or the relationship is new. Remember to ask them what they want to do about their relationship, and not assume they want to stay in it, or leave it. Ask how you can help. If they don’t want to talk at that time, let them know…

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Trauma & Trafficking

“Trauma and Trafficking” was the theme of Cabrini University’s 8th annual Domestic Violence symposium. The event was sponsored by the Barbara and John Jordan Center for Children of Trauma and Domestic Violence Education, whose purpose is to promote social change through professional development, training, education, and research to end domestic violence and support children exposed to trauma. This symposium illustrated the intersectionality between women who experienced commercial sexual exploitation and the use of violence and control to maintain victimization. Local and regional expert panelists included law enforcement, clinical, medical, school district, and immigrant and advocacy providers. Keynote Speaker Barbara Amaya - a survivor, author, and award-winning advocate in the movement to end human trafficking - shared her experiences as a survivor. She pointed out that anyone who works directly with survivors needs to understand how critical violence, control, and trauma bonds make it difficult to escape these destructive relationships. She…

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Domestic Violence Awareness Month

This and every October, Philadelphia recognizes Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Domestic violence can affect anyone — regardless of your class, race, marital status, sexual orientation, or gender identity. In the United States, an average of 20 people experience intimate partner physical violence every minute, according to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. This equates to more than 10 million abuse victims annually. According to the CDC’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, nearly 1 in 4 women and 1 in 7 men report having experienced severe physical violence from an intimate partner in their lifetime. About 1 in 6 women and 1 in 14 men have experienced contact sexual violence by an intimate partner. Domestic Violence is more than just physical abuse — it is a pattern of behaviors that a partner uses against the other person with the purpose of gaining and maintaining power and control in the…

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