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Diabetes and Mental Health

November is National Diabetes Month, a time when communities across the country bring attention to the impact diabetes has on Americans - including the relationship between diabetes and depression. A day in the life Living with diabetes requires daily physical and emotional demands. The idea that diabetes can be managed simply by eating healthier and exercising more is a myth. Yes, eating nutritious foods and enjoying physical movement is good for the heart, soul, and for diabetes management; but there is so much more to living healthy with diabetes. It’s a daily balancing act between all the things that raise blood sugar and those that lower blood sugar, including food, medication, alcohol, physical activity, and stress. Not to mention hormones, sleep, illness, hydration, altitude, insulin gone bad, and so much more. People with diabetes have to constantly sort through mixed messages around food choices. They have to navigate insurance coverage…

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National Depression Screening Day 2015

Dana Careless
Manager for Health Promotion
DBHIDS

Picture Citizens Bank Park Stadium.  Look around at all of the seats, row after row, filled with over 40,000 spectators.  Now, I want you to picture dividing the stadium into four equal parts, each part containing over 10,000 individuals.  Statistically speaking, that entire group of people is living with a diagnosable mental health challenge.

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Active Commuting: A Route to Physical and Mental Wellbeing

Dana Careless
Clinical Operations Manager for Health Promotion
DBHIDS

Nur Atiqa Asri
Project Analyst
Center for Active Design

"Walk it off." How many times have you heard someone say that to a person who needs to blow off some steam? We have heard that getting some fresh air and exercising can be a great way to relieve stress.  But are our cities designed to encourage this? And if they're not, what does this mean about our stress levels and emotional well-being?

Nur Atiqa Asri, from the Center for Active Design, tackles this head on as she explores what it means to "actively commute" to work and how this shift can dramatically improve our physical and mental well-being. Check out her blog contribution below:

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