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Go Red for Women

Join DBHIDS as we celebrate National Wear Red Day to raise awareness about women and heart disease. Please wear red or a splash of red this Friday, February 1! Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States, causing 1 in 4 deaths each year. But the warning signs for women aren’t the same in men. The fact is: Heart disease is also the No. 1 killer of women, causing 1 in 3 deaths each year or approximately one woman every minute! Did you know that African American women and Hispanic women are at increased risk for heart disease? African American women have an estimated 40% chance of having heart disease or stroke Hispanic women have a 30% likelihood of having heart disease or stroke. The good news is that 80% of the risk factors associated with women and heart disease, such as obesity, lack of physical activity, and high blood pressure, can be managed…

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Opioid Recovery & the Holidays

David T. Jones, commissioner of Philadelphia's Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services, spoke with KYW Community Affairs reporter Cherri Gregg about what it takes to get through the holidays when you have loved ones in recovery for opioid addiction. Listen to the interview below:

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Mental Health & the Holidays

Some people who experience holiday sadness or depression have feelings that are triggered by the holidays but go away when the season ends, while others experience a more severe depression that is triggered during the holiday season and lasts well into the New Year. The holiday blues - feelings of anxiety or depression around the holidays - can lead to long-term mental health conditions. The National Alliance on Mental Illness shared tips for managing the Holiday Blues in this video:

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Trauma & Trafficking

“Trauma and Trafficking” was the theme of Cabrini University’s 8th annual Domestic Violence symposium. The event was sponsored by the Barbara and John Jordan Center for Children of Trauma and Domestic Violence Education, whose purpose is to promote social change through professional development, training, education, and research to end domestic violence and support children exposed to trauma. This symposium illustrated the intersectionality between women who experienced commercial sexual exploitation and the use of violence and control to maintain victimization. Local and regional expert panelists included law enforcement, clinical, medical, school district, and immigrant and advocacy providers. Keynote Speaker Barbara Amaya - a survivor, author, and award-winning advocate in the movement to end human trafficking - shared her experiences as a survivor. She pointed out that anyone who works directly with survivors needs to understand how critical violence, control, and trauma bonds make it difficult to escape these destructive relationships. She…

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