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Impact of Gardening on Mental Health

This week we celebrate Earth Day and Arbor Day, and there’s no better way to celebrate these holidays than by getting your hands dirty. Gardening engages you physically, mentally, and socially. Health benefits are numerous and you don’t need to live in the suburbs or the country to experience gardening and its benefits.  Gardening can positively impact a number of health outcomes, including: Reduced symptoms of depression and anxiety Decrease in reported stress and mood disturbances Decrease in BMI Higher reported sense of community Increased physical activity Improved cognitive function Gardening has both immediate and long-term effects on health. For individuals with mental health conditions, horticultural therapy - using gardening as a means to facilitate dialogue and skill building - has shown promise for improving chronic and acute mental health conditions. People report feeling happier almost immediately when engaging in gardening. Over time, individuals lowered their BMI through physical activity…

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Go Red for Women

Join DBHIDS as we celebrate National Wear Red Day to raise awareness about women and heart disease. Please wear red or a splash of red this Friday, February 1! Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States, causing 1 in 4 deaths each year. But the warning signs for women aren’t the same in men. The fact is: Heart disease is also the No. 1 killer of women, causing 1 in 3 deaths each year or approximately one woman every minute! Did you know that African American women and Hispanic women are at increased risk for heart disease? African American women have an estimated 40% chance of having heart disease or stroke Hispanic women have a 30% likelihood of having heart disease or stroke. The good news is that 80% of the risk factors associated with women and heart disease, such as obesity, lack of physical activity, and high blood pressure, can be managed…

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Mental Health & the Holidays

Some people who experience holiday sadness or depression have feelings that are triggered by the holidays but go away when the season ends, while others experience a more severe depression that is triggered during the holiday season and lasts well into the New Year. The holiday blues - feelings of anxiety or depression around the holidays - can lead to long-term mental health conditions. The National Alliance on Mental Illness shared tips for managing the Holiday Blues in this video:

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Diabetes and Mental Health

November is National Diabetes Month, a time when communities across the country bring attention to the impact diabetes has on Americans - including the relationship between diabetes and depression. A day in the life Living with diabetes requires daily physical and emotional demands. The idea that diabetes can be managed simply by eating healthier and exercising more is a myth. Yes, eating nutritious foods and enjoying physical movement is good for the heart, soul, and for diabetes management; but there is so much more to living healthy with diabetes. It’s a daily balancing act between all the things that raise blood sugar and those that lower blood sugar, including food, medication, alcohol, physical activity, and stress. Not to mention hormones, sleep, illness, hydration, altitude, insulin gone bad, and so much more. People with diabetes have to constantly sort through mixed messages around food choices. They have to navigate insurance coverage…

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