April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month

Sexual Assault Awareness Month is a campaign to raise public awareness about sexual violence and educate communities on how to prevent it. The campaign theme for 2019 is I Ask – a theme that champions the message that asking for consent is a healthy, normal, and necessary part of everyday interactions. Sexual Assault and Mental Health Sexual assault is not only a physical trauma, but a mental one that can have both short- and long-term effects on a victim’s mental health. According to RAINN (the nation’s largest anti-sexual violence organization), victims of sexual assault are at an increased risk for developing: Depression Substance use disorders Eating disorders Anxiety Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Many survivors experience flashbacks of their assault, and feelings of shame, isolation, shock, and guilt. People who have been sexually assaulted are more likely to use drugs. Events Join the movement by attending Sexual Assault Awareness Events in Philadelphia: 4/11/2019: Teal Day Press Conference 4/14/2019: Benefit Concert 4/26/2019: Hands Around City Hall Consent When someone gives consent, they give their permission for something to happen, or they agree to do something. Consent means they know what they’re agreeing to. It’s not just about asking for consent, but also about listening and accepting the answer. The National Sexual Violence Resource Center offers resources on consent: Asking for Consent Asking [...]

2021-01-04T20:34:48-05:00April 1st, 2019|Domestic Violence, Trauma, Women's Health|

Trauma & Trafficking

“Trauma and Trafficking” was the theme of Cabrini University’s 8th annual Domestic Violence symposium. The event was sponsored by the Barbara and John Jordan Center for Children of Trauma and Domestic Violence Education, whose purpose is to promote social change through professional development, training, education, and research to end domestic violence and support children exposed to trauma. This symposium illustrated the intersectionality between women who experienced commercial sexual exploitation and the use of violence and control to maintain victimization. Local and regional expert panelists included law enforcement, clinical, medical, school district, and immigrant and advocacy providers. Keynote Speaker Barbara Amaya - a survivor, author, and award-winning advocate in the movement to end human trafficking - shared her experiences as a survivor. She pointed out that anyone who works directly with survivors needs to understand how critical violence, control, and trauma bonds make it difficult to escape these destructive relationships. She stressed the following: Time and trust are required to break the trauma bond Victims never view themselves as being trafficked Providers must ask the right questions that are trauma informed and offer choices Survivor to survivor connections and voices offer hope and empowerment NOBODY’S GIRL BY BARBARA AMAYA How violence, control and false love are used to exploit women In Nobody’s Girl, Barbara Amaya recounts her lost innocence at age [...]

2018-11-16T15:28:44-05:00November 16th, 2018|Domestic Violence, Trauma|

Healing for Communities that Experience Violence

Over the years, Philadelphia has implemented a number of approaches to strengthen local communities. In particular, the Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services (DBHIDS) has implemented multiple programs that reach our neighborhoods— some examples include Mental Health First Aid, Faith and Spiritual Affairs, and Healing Hurt People.

2021-01-04T21:21:07-05:00August 11th, 2016|Community, Support, Trauma|
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