On International Men’s Day: Be Respectful of Women

Since 1999, Nov. 19 has been designated as International Men’s Day. The day has been used to celebrate men who are role models to their families, communities, and the world. This year’s theme is better relations between men and women. Conflict between men and women is as old as mankind itself and has been depicted in Biblical tales, romance novels, movies, and television soap operas as well as real life courtroom dramas and “Me Too” era sexual harassment lawsuits publicized in the media. Arguably the most consequential conflict between men and women on the national stage earlier this year was the U.S. Supreme Court decision that overturned Roe v. Wade, the landmark legislation that gave women the constitutional right to an abortion. This decision is a legal win for “pro-life” men and women. However, many women argue that this male majority legal decision was driven by men seeking to control women’s reproductive lives. Women are not alone in this analysis, as many men disagree with the Supreme Court decision and support a woman’s right to choose. Regardless of what side of the argument men find themselves on, there are things men can do to support women during this challenging time in our country’s history. Men can be nonjudgmental when engaging in hot-button discussions that are important to women such as [...]

2022-11-14T11:27:17-05:00November 14th, 2022|Men's Health|

Taking Control of Men’s Health: The Ultimate Act of Self Reliance

Men’s health is often the unspoken “elephant in the room” whenever healthcare disparities are discussed. While it’s great that our healthcare system is actively addressing racial and ethnic disparities, gender disparities are glaring and commonly ignored in developing interventions and programs. The numbers are clear on the matter. In Philadelphia: The life expectancy for men is seven years less than that of women. Black men have the lowest life expectancy of all racial/ethnic groups, dying from heart disease, lung and colorectal cancer, diabetes, homicide, and even COVID at significantly higher rates than women. Men also experience more opioid overdoses. Men are three times more likely than women to die by suicide. Men are less likely than women to follow up with care after being discharged from hospitals.  There are multiple reasons for these disparities. A simplistic explanation is that men are less likely to seek healthcare. That certainly holds true for the men in my family. Helping them understand that chronic symptoms won’t just go away and convincing them to work with a healthcare provider for preventive care is quite a challenge. Understanding why men don’t go to the doctor or therapy needs to be studied.  As a licensed clinician providing behavioral health support in various settings over the years, I know that men frequently share that they don’t feel [...]

2022-06-06T09:25:18-04:00June 6th, 2022|Men's Health, Mental Health|

Men’s Health Month 2020: It’s Time for a Change

With a new decade comes the opportunity to both look back and look forward. This time for reflection gives us all a unique occasion to evaluate how we have been dealing with our health, both physical and mental. Men, especially, should take this time to do just that. According to a Cleveland Clinic study, men are less likely to take care of themselves and their health than women. They are half as likely to visit the doctor for a check-up compared to women. Over 7 million American men have not seen a doctor in over 10 years, citing embarrassment, lack of convenience, not wanting a bad diagnosis, and being told as children not to complain about medical problems as reasons for avoiding doctors visits. It's 2020, and it's time for that to change. Men from 19 to 90 still need routine checkups, and in light of COVID-19, need to take responsibility for their health. In his recent blog, Black men and boys are not immune to COVID-19 Eric Westbrook, Director of the Mayor’s Office of Black Male Engagement writes, “ COVID-19 coronavirus seems to impact those with preexisting health conditions like diabetes, heart and lung disease that make it difficult for them to fight the virus." Here is a decade-by-decade breakdown of when men should be getting certain checkups: 20s: [...]

2021-03-16T13:44:46-04:00June 1st, 2020|Men's Health, Self-Help|

Fast Facts: Men’s Health Month

Women of DBHIDS Supporting Men's Health Month by Wearing Blue June is Men’s Health Month - a time to raise awareness of preventable health problems and encourage early detection and treatment of disease among men and boys.  Consider these statistics: 450,000 men die of cardiovascular disease each year (CDC). More than 700,000 men are diagnosed with a type of cancer each year; 300,000 of those cases will result in death (Men’s Health Resource Center). 230,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year. It’s the second leading cause of death in men (Cancer.org)  More than 60% of adult American men are overweight or obese (National Institutes of Health). As part of an educational campaign for men’s health, The Cleveland Clinic surveyed more than 500 American men ages 18-70 about their use of healthcare resources and found:  Only 3 out of 5 men get annual physicals Over 40% of men only go to the doctor when they think they have a serious medical condition More than half of men said their health wasn’t something they talk about. It’s time for men to take a proactive approach to health - both physical and mental health. While you’re here, take a quick screening. Then review these guidelines for keeping an eye on your physical health:     

2021-01-02T21:53:39-05:00June 14th, 2019|Awareness, Men's Health, Self-Help, Stress|
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